Surrogacy for Irish Citizens

IVF and adoption are two of the most common options considered when conception has not occurred naturally. Unfortunately IVF is not always successful and adoption waiting lists in Ireland are long and the process so complex that prospective parents may need to look at other options to start a family of their own.

Some countries such as Australia, Israel, the Netherlands, UK and Greece permit altruistic surrogacy only, whereas others such as France, Germany, Italy, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and many other Islamic countries do not permit any form of surrogacy.

Currently, there is no legislation in Ireland in regards to surrogacy, this means the parentage issues are more complicated. Legal advice and support is required. Countries like Ukraine, Cyprusand Greeceare becoming increasingly popular, but you need to understand if you are eligible.

International surrogacy will cost between €30,000and over 100,000 depending on the country and agency you choose.

Where do most Irish singles and couples engage for surrogacy?

Most singles and couples seek assistance through programs in countries like Ukraine, Greece, USA or Canada. Ukraine has strict medical requirements and only accepts married heterosexual couples. Greece only accepts heterosexual couples or single females under 50 years. Countries such as Cyprus, US and Canada have far more accepting rules. Growing Families can advise on reliable providers of IVF and surrogacy services globally.

Can I utilise an Irish surrogate?

This is possible, however it would need to be either host surrogacy, using your surrogates own eggs, or you would need to perform the IVF process outside Ireland (for example in UK or Cyprus) given Irish clinics are not permitted under current legislation to assist with in-country gestational surrogacy. A small number of Irish couples do local a local surrogate and find ways of making this work.

Who is the legal parent or guardian?

To avoid potential problems regarding the laws of both Ireland and the surrogate’s home country, it will be necessary to ensure you protect your rights and those of your new child and obtain legal advice in both Ireland and the surrogate’s host country.

On your return home the Irish Father will typically apply to the Irish Courts to establish their legal relationship with the child.